A FEW HIGHLAND PLANTS TO ROUND OFF OCTOBER

10/28/2017

Hey guys! Alvin here. Sorry about the lack of activity recently, Dan and I have both been very busy this fall. Nonetheless, now that temperatures have started to decrease here in the Northeast, I had to share a few snapshots of some of my cool-growing plants that are starting to look nice again. I find autumn to be a curious time as a CP grower; although the shorter photoperiod and cooler weather signify the end of the growing season for all of my temperate carnivores, this is also the time of year where many of the highland plants that sulked during summer start to look their best. Enjoy!

Highland Nepenthes
Nepenthes glabrata is a dainty species native to the highlands of Sulawesi, Indonesia. This particular plant is a tissue-cultured clone from Borneo Exotics.

Highland Nepenthes
I've often heard growers remark that the pitchers of N. glabrata look as if they were painted by hand.

Highland Nepenthes
Drosera solaris, a beautiful South American species endemic to the Maringma-Tepui in the Pakaraima Mountains. Unfortunately my other individual croaked for no apparent reason, and the remaining plant shows no signs of wanting to flower.

Highland Nepenthes
This Heliamphora ionasi put out its first adult pitcher for me! I expect it'll still be some time before the pitchers develop their characteristic narrow waist, but the coloration is still quite nice.

Highland Nepenthes
The pitcher after developing for a few days. Hairy!

Highland Drosera
This H. heterodoxa is also looking decent at the moment.

Highland Drosera
Drosera slackii always looks great this time of year. Mine always tends to sulk with higher temperatures during summer.

Highland Drosera
Drosera cuneifolia from the Silvermine Nature Reserve starting to form a neat skirt of dead leaves.

Highland Drosera
I'm told that the Silvermine forms don't tend to stop growth in summer, unlike the Table Mountain forms. My Silvermine plant has never slowed down.

Highland Drosera
D. graomogolensis never fails to impress. This species seems to be a lot more tolerant of higher temperatures than the other South American Drosera.

Highland Drosera
It's clear why this species is one of the most desired South American species in cultivation.

Highland Drosera
A large Drosera regia; I recently sold this plant and it will be going off to a new home soon, so I wanted to get a last picture of it.

Highland Nepenthes
A young Nepenthes edwardsiana clone from Native Exotics. It appears to be a strong grower; it was less than half this size when I picked it up a bit over a year ago.

Highland Nepenthes
A tiny pitcher half-buried in Sphagnum.

Highland Nepenthes
Nepenthes murudensis

Highland Nepenthes
This species is closely related to N. tentaculata.

Highland Nepenthes
Heliamphora exappendiculata, Chimantá-Tepui

Heliamphora
H. exappendiculata, Apacapa-Tepui

Heliamphora
My H. minor recently bloomed again so attempted to pollinate it (unlike last time, I was successful in getting pollen from the anthers of the first flower without a tuning fork).

Heliamphora
Utricularia reniformis with its distinctive kidney-shaped leaves. The specific epithet is a reference to the leaf shape, in fact.

Heliamphora
It's getting a bit crowded in there, I may have to take divisions soon.

Epiphytic Utricularia
This Utricularia quelchii took almost a year to settle in, but now it's begun to put on some decent stolon growth.

Epiphytic Utricularia

Epiphytic Utricularia

Highland Nepenthes
N. jacquelineae squatting in a H. minor pitcher. I would have taken it out of the tank for a proper photo but the plant was too tangled in the back.